Skip to main content

Tai Chi May Help Prevent Falls




Practicing tai chi helps older people improve their balance and avoid falls, a review of studies has found.

Tai chi is a form of Chinese martial arts now practiced as exercise. It involves a specific program of graceful movements, accompanied by deep breathing and mental focus, that slowly move the center of balance from one leg to the other.

Researchers found 10 randomized trials analyzing the effect of tai chi on the incidence of falls or the time until an elderly person first has a fall. All studies compared tai chi to usual care or other treatments like physical therapy, stretching or exercise.

The analysis, in the Journal of the American Geriatric Society, found that tai chi reduced the incidence of falls by 43 percent in those followed for less than a year and by 13 percent in those followed longer. There was no effect of tai chi on time to first fall, and there was some weak evidence that the practice reduced the number of falls that resulted in injury. Falls are a leading cause of broken hips and other serious problems in older men and women.

The lead author, Rafael Lomas-Vega of the University of Jaen in Spain, said that none of the studies showed any adverse effects of tai chi.

“We recommend tai chi as a safe practice for the prevention of falls,” he said. “And some reviews have found positive effects on chronic conditions such as cancer, osteoarthritis and heart failure.”

Taken from: NY Times

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

5. MasterCard launching selfie payments

MasterCard wants to ditch the old-fashioned password and use selfies to approve online purchases.
The company announced it is launching new mobile technologies that will allow customers to authenticate their online purchases using selfies or fingerprints.
The technology will be rolled out by big banks in the U.S., Canada, the U.K. and some European countries over the next few months.
People from around the world will be regularly using this authentication technology within five years, said Ajay Bhalla, president of enterprise security solutions at MasterCard (MA).
Bhalla said that using facial and fingerprint scans for purchases is safer than typed passwords since many customers foolishly use easy-to-guess codes.
Customers who want to try selfie authentication will have to download a special MasterCard app that will allow them to take a photo each time they make an online purchase. Their face (or fingerprint) will be scanned to prove that they -- not hackers or thieves -- are making …

7. At Yosemite, a Waterfall Turns Into a Firefall

For a few weeks in February if the conditions are just right, for about 10 minutes around sunset, one waterfall in Yosemite National Park looks more like its opposite — a firefall.
Visitors who flocked to the California park last week, many with cameras in tow, have not been disappointed by the glowing transformation of Horsetail Fall, which flows from El Capitan.
“In the over 20 years I have been photographing the firefall and leading workshops there in Yosemite, I have never seen a more spectacular one,” said Michael Mariant, a photographer from Morro Bay, Calif., who leads teaching trips to Yosemite.
The phenomenon occurs if there has been enough snow and rain in the Sierra Mountains to fuel the waterfall, if the skies are clear and if the setting sun strikes the water at an angle that creates the illusion of lava. Mike Gauthier, the park’s chief of staff, said that he was not sure if it was definitely the best firefall ever. But it certainly trumps the firefall the last few years…

Disney nixes happiest currency on Earth

Disney is no longer minting money.

At least one kind -- the company recently announced that it will no longer print and sell its beloved currency, Disney Dollars.

The bills, which feature iconic Disney (DIS) characters and are signed by treasurer Scrooge McDuck, are worth real U.S. dollars. They're like gift certificates and can still be used at Disney theme parks, resorts, hotels, restaurants and stores. But for many Disney die-hards, they're also collectibles
Typically Mickey Mouse was on the $1, Goofy was on the $5 and Minnie Mouse was on the $10.
The bills also featured princesses like Cinderella and Sleeping Beauty, villains like Cruella de Vil and Captain Hook; and characters like Dumbo, Simba, the 101 Dalmations and even Lilo from "Lilo and Stitch."


Disney stopped selling the bills on May 14, but many are listed on eBay (EBAY).

A special edition $50 bill from 2005 that marked Disneyland's 50th anniversary just sold for $495 on Wednesday, which works out to…